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This is 2013 Not 1984


Posted on July 06, 2013 by Akashma Online News

By Marivel Guzman

This is 2013 No 1984

Dear All:

To understand the scope of whats is going on, on “politics and in the world of government”, we must understand what really is government and the entities behind it.
The entities that manage the governments are just a bunch of leaches or parasites living out of the resources of the country they control, and for that, they set up entities or companies that exploit those resources, these entities known as corporations control every action taken by the governments, and it is really no brainier to see that the great majority of the people of every country lives under the worse conditions.
How these entities get away with the pillage of the resources? They are ghost companies with no liability or accountability on its own damage because their CEOS do not live in the countries they exploit. The corporations are set up on such way, that they can only be trace to a small boxes somewhere in the Canary Islands. They pay no taxes, they follow no laws. The governments pretend they control them, but the truth is, that corporations control the governments.
This is no news at all, had happened all the times, people had complain all the time, but people was not organized with the speed that they do now, with the use of the social networks.
An analysis of the social networks was done by Professor Zeynep Tufekci- She is a fellow at the Center for Information Technology Policy at Princeton University and an assistant professor at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hillthat explain how the process works, and why it works. You can read her article explaining with surgical eye the behavior of people and government in the internet and social networks era.

Corporate World

Every government has a groups of “workers”, namely government officials that are in charge of deliver every action agreed behind the doors of these corporations.
In the US, the executive, the legislative and the judicial each one of these wing of government are in charge of the policies set up by the corporations.
So, when Edward Snowden leaked or better said, told the world, -not just the American public,- but the whole world, that The US is spying on everyone of us, it did open a door for the world to see what in reality our governments are and what they are capable of.

If you see the commotion caused in other government’s countries by this leaked information, you saw that was minimal, but the “People, We the people were and still outraged, but the other governments just showed a little bit of distress, not really a big deal for them, Why? because they all know about it, they also spy on their own people. But, the US spy on E V E R Y B O D Y, INCLUDING THE OTHER GOVERNMENTS OR GROUP OF LEACHES.

Follow every step this whole affairs has taken. The moment Snowden revealed the information to us, immediately every one in position of power grabbed their microphones and say that they all agree with the behavior of the government, meaning that they do not care if the government is spying on them. Well they might not care now because they are on the other side of the fence, but as soon as they end their term, I want to see them supporting the surveillance on them.
If we analyze the history of men kind, we see that since there is written history we clearly see that since the beginning there has been the top class and the bottom and off course the Class that plays the role of government, which is the one that protects the interest, and the well being of the top class.
And off course, once we know what this group of leaches are doing, of course every one is a potential enemy, because the Government do not know how each of us is going to react.

These images were taken in both  Cairo and Alexandria
Images from Paul Zholdra, Sally Zohney and D.L Mayfield via Twitter
Biggest Protest Egypt History

Egypt protests 3

Protesters opposing Egyptian President Mursi shout slogans and make fireworkes during a protest in Tahrir square in Cairo

There is really a concern for the governments of the world since the Arab Springs started to flourish. It does not matter that the Government spread information or better say, spread misinformation telling the world that is not the people that is outpouring into the streets by the millions on their own will but  the US who is controlling the revolutions.

NO way, The Governments are really scare of the people, they might control few hundreds thousands but they can not control millions. It is impossible with 100,000 thousands soldiers to control 33 millions angry, starving people.
If the time comes that the whole world stand up in their feet and demand justice and equality, there is the possibility that the same army personal will raise with the people. There are just a little number of high ranking army, and navy people that make enough to have a relaxed life, but the great majority are living on a very stretched income.
And the governments would be suicide if they even thinking on using weapons of mass destruction to control millions of people protesting on the streets, they would be shooting their own feet, because wanted or not, the arm forces of the stronger governments of the world are men of honor and they would not commit to murder their own citizens.

Snowden Censored by Craven Media


Posted on June 10, 2013 by Akashma Online News

10 June 2013

Snowden Censored by Craven Media

Mr. Snowden, please send your 41 PRISM slides and other information to less easily cowed and overly coddled commercial outlets than Washington Post and Guardian. Their arm-waving, self-aggrandizing verbosity, after conspiring to obey official demand (below) to censor your information is a pattern well-documented by unfettered disclosure sites. Their piecemealing release is hoary dramatization, diverting cover-up, of failure to deliver untampered material. Your valor is yet to be fully disclosed, do not settle for being seduced by false promises portending being kicked under the bus. Heed this under-bus-kick published today by Secrecy News:

EDWARD SNOWDEN, SOURCE OF NSA LEAKS, STEPS FORWARD… “When you are subverting the power of government– that’s a fundamentally dangerous thing to democracy.”

“I’m willing to go on the record to defend the authenticity [of these disclosures]. This is the truth. This is what’s happening. You should decide whether we need to be doing this,” he said of his disclosures.

In the history of unauthorized disclosures of classified information, a voluntary admission of having committed such disclosures is the exception, not the norm. And it confers a degree of dignity on the action. Yet it stops short of a full acceptance of responsibility. That would entail surrendering to authorities and accepting the legal consequences of “subverting the power of government” and carrying out “a fundamentally dangerous thing to democracy.”

And two days ago this go-to-prison kick by The Atlantic:

Whistle-blowing is the moral response to immoral activity by those in power. What’s important here are government programs and methods, not data about individuals. I understand I am asking for people to engage in illegal and dangerous behavior. Do it carefully and do it safely, but — and I am talking directly to you, person working on one of these secret and probably illegal programs — do it.

High officers and rhetoricians convene safe at base to wargame, destined by history, to praise and send youngsters into harm’s way to protect high privilege, then crow about leadership, sacrifice, pretending remorse, gloating in amply-pensioned retirement. Bear in mind, fodder for their ambitions is how they see you imprisoned for disobedience, emblazoned in by-lined headlines, warehoused in vet hospitals, or best, flag-draped in coffins disappearing into vote-rigged databanks.


http://www.wect.com/story/22544509/snowdens-cautious-approach-to-post-reporter

To effect his plan, Snowden asked for a guarantee that The Washington Post would publish – within 72 hours – the full text of a PowerPoint presentation describing PRISM, a top-secret surveillance program that gathered intelligence from Microsoft, Facebook, Google and other Silicon Valley companies. He also asked that The Post publish online a cryptographic key that he could use to prove to a foreign embassy that he was the document’s source.

Gellman told him the Post would not make any guarantee about what the Post published or when. The Post broke the story two weeks later, on Thursday. The Post sought the views of government officials about the potential harm to national security prior to publication and decided to reproduce only four of the 41 slides, Gellman wrote in his story about their communications.


What We Don’t Know About Spying on Citizens: Scarier Than What We Know


The NSA’s surveillance of cell-phone calls show how badly we need to protect the

whistle-blowers who provide transparency and accountability.

Jun 6 2013, 12:24 PM ET
NSAdishes.banner.reuters.jpg.jpg
Jason Reed/Reuters

Yesterday, we learned that the NSA received all calling records from Verizon customers for a three-month period starting in April. That’s everything except the voice content: who called who, where they were, how long the call lasted — for millions of people, both Americans and foreigners. This “metadata” allows the government to track the movements of everyone during that period, and a build a detailed picture of who talks to whom. It’s exactly the same data the Justice Department collected about AP journalists.

The Guardian delivered this revelation after receiving a copy of a secret memo about this — presumably from a whistle-blower. We don’t know if the other phone companies handed data to the NSA too. We don’t know if this was a one-off demand or a continuously renewed demand; the order started a few days after the Boston bombers were captured by police.

We don’t know a lot about how the government spies on us, but we know some things. We know the FBI has issued tens of thousands of ultra-secret National Security Letters to collect all sorts of data on people — we believe on millions of people — and has been abusing them to spy on cloud-computer users. We know it can collect a wide array of personal data from the Internet without a warrant. We also know that the FBI has been intercepting cell-phone data, all but voice content, for the past 20 years without a warrant, and can use the microphone on some powered-off cell phones as a room bug — presumably only with a warrant.

We know that the NSA has many domestic-surveillance and data-mining programs with codenames like Trailblazer, Stellar Wind, and Ragtime — deliberately using different codenames for similar programs to stymie oversight and conceal what’s really going on. We know that the NSA is building an enormous computer facility in Utah to store all this data, as well as faster computer networks to process it all. We know the U.S. Cyber Command employs 4,000 people.

We know that the DHS is also collecting a massive amount of data on people, and that local police departments are running “fusion centers” to collect and analyze this data, and covering up its failures. This is all part of the militarization of the police.

Remember in 2003, when Congress defunded the decidedly creepy Total Information Awareness program? It didn’t die; it just changed names and split into many smaller programs. We know that corporations are doing an enormous amount of spying on behalf of the government: all parts.

We know all of this not because the government is honest and forthcoming, but mostly through three backchannels — inadvertent hints or outright admissions by government officials in hearings and court cases, information gleaned from government documents received under FOIA, and government whistle-blowers.

There’s much more we don’t know, and often what we know is obsolete. We know quite a bit about the NSA’s ECHELON program from a 2000 European investigation, and about the DHS’s plans for Total Information Awareness from 2002, but much less about how these programs have evolved. We can make inferences about the NSA’s Utah facility based on the theoretical amount of data from various sources, the cost of computation, and the power requirements from the facility, but those are rough guesses at best. For a lot of this, we’re completely in the dark.

And that’s wrong.

The U.S. government is on a secrecy binge. It overclassifies more information than ever. And we learn, again and again, that our government regularly classifies things not because they need to be secret, but because their release would be embarrassing.

Knowing how the government spies on us is important. Not only because so much of it is illegal — or, to be as charitable as possible, based on novel interpretations of the law — but because we have a right to know. Democracy requires an informed citizenry in order to function properly, and transparency and accountability are essential parts of that. That means knowing what our government is doing to us, in our name. That means knowing that the government is operating within the constraints of the law. Otherwise, we’re living in a police state.

We need whistle-blowers.

Leaking information without getting caught is difficult. It’s almost impossible to maintain privacy in the Internet Age. The WikiLeaks platform seems to have been secure — Bradley Manning was caught not because of a technological flaw, but because someone he trusted betrayed him — but the U.S. government seems to have successfully destroyed it as a platform. None of the spin-offs have risen to become viable yet. The New Yorker recently unveiled its Strongbox platform for leaking material, which is still new but looks good. This link contains the best advice on how to leak information to the press via phone, email, or the post office. The National Whistleblowers Center has a page on national-security whistle-blowers and their rights.

Leaking information is also very dangerous. The Obama Administration has embarked on a war on whistle-blowers, pursuing them — both legally and through intimidation — further than any previous administration has done. Mark Klein, Thomas Drake, and William Binney have all been persecuted for exposing technical details of our surveillance state. Bradley Manning has been treated cruelly and inhumanly — and possibly tortured — for his more-indiscriminate leaking of State Department secrets.

The Obama Administration’s actions against the Associated Press, its persecution of Julian Assange, and its unprecedented prosecution of Manning on charges of “aiding the enemy” demonstrate how far it’s willing to go to intimidate whistle-blowers — as well as the journalists who talk to them.

But whistle-blowing is vital, even more broadly than in government spying. It’s necessary for good government, and to protect us from abuse of power.

We need details on the full extent of the FBI’s spying capabilities. We don’t know what information it routinely collects on American citizens, what extra information it collects on those on various watch lists, and what legal justifications it invokes for its actions. We don’t know its plans for future data collection. We don’t know what scandals and illegal actions — either past or present — are currently being covered up.

We also need information about what data the NSA gathers, either domestically or internationally. We don’t know how much it collects surreptitiously, and how much it relies on arrangements with various companies. We don’t know how much it uses password cracking to get at encrypted data, and how much it exploits existing system vulnerabilities. We don’t know whether it deliberately inserts backdoors into systems it wants to monitor, either with or without the permission of the communications-system vendors.

And we need details about the sorts of analysis the organizations perform. We don’t know what they quickly cull at the point of collection, and what they store for later analysis — and how long they store it. We don’t know what sort of database profiling they do, how extensive their CCTV and surveillance-drone analysis is, how much they perform behavioral analysis, or how extensively they trace friends of people on their watch lists.

We don’t know how big the U.S. surveillance apparatus is today, either in terms of money and people or in terms of how many people are monitored or how much data is collected. Modern technology makes it possible to monitor vastly more people — yesterday’s NSA revelations demonstrate that they could easily surveil everyone — than could ever be done manually.

Whistle-blowing is the moral response to immoral activity by those in power. What’s important here are government programs and methods, not data about individuals. I understand I am asking for people to engage in illegal and dangerous behavior. Do it carefully and do it safely, but — and I am talking directly to you, person working on one of these secret and probably illegal programs — do it.

If you see something, say something. There are many people in the U.S. that will appreciate and admire you.

For the rest of us, we can help by protesting this war on whistle-blowers. We need to force our politicians not to punish them — to investigate the abuses and not the messengers — and to ensure that those unjustly persecuted can obtain redress.

Our government is putting its own self-interest ahead of the interests of the country. That needs to change.

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